Kingswood

AS / A Level Science/ Biology

Our AS and A Level courses are developed to link to the needs of individual specifications including AQA, WJEC, Edexcel and OCR and will provide you with key skills needed for your examinations and research projects. See below for information on studies used to support the current and new specifications. Through the new specifications we offer more emphasis on the individual mathematics skills in a practical environment as well as facilitating some of your specifications practical assessments.

Our highly trained, specialist instructors will deliver your tailored programme to fulfil your objectives. See below for individual studies and specifications:

aslevelsciencebiolofy
aslevelsciencebiolofy

Suitable for

Secondary schools

Ethics and the environment

Students will debate on all aspects of ethics involved in biology with particular reference given to implementation and planning of fieldwork. Studying for the 2015 specifications include key references in HSW10 in OCR and Edexcel 1.17 discussing potential ethical issues using invertebrates for research. The students will break down the concept of ethics, discussing how it affects us in terms of biology fieldwork, including sampling on a small scale and the wider world.

Mark release capture

Students will estimate population size of woodlice using the mark release recapture method. Students will learn how to measure populations of animals and the associated assumptions, using correct equations to work out population sizes and explore the ethical issues involved when dealing with invertebrates. They will also explore the accuracies of their findings. This supports many specifications including core learning in AQA and supporting 1.17 (ethical issues using invertebrates for research) in Edexcel specifications.

Pond dipping

Students will be dipping through the surface film, open water and bottom mud layers of a pond to explore the abundance and distribution of organisms. Students can use collected data and create pyramids of numbers and biomass and present all other data using our top of the range ICT facilities. The students will also use the Trent Biotic Index to describe the cleanliness of the water amongst exploring other abiotic factors. There is also the chance to use the Simpson’s Index of Diversity for the different levels of the pond. This can link to core subject content in the OCR (Simpsons Index of Diversity and Ecosystems), AQA (Simpsons Index of Diversity and Productivity), WJEC (Abundance and distribution of organism in a habitat) and Edexcel (Species Richness and Diversity) specifications. Fieldwork may include:

  • Sweep Sampling and Identification
  • Trent Biotic Index
  • Various Abiotic Measurements

Key mathematical skills can also be developed in a practical setting for use in examinations, scientific drawings will be taken throughout the study and evaluating and presenting the data will be made easy using our ICT facilities on centre.

Woodland study

Students will have the opportunity to explore different areas of a woodland and compare different habitats in order to discover their richness and abundance. Students will explore the management of different areas of the woodland and the reasoning behind this. They will further explore the relationship between abiotic and biotic factors of their woodland to see if any relationships are present. This can link to AQA (‘Biodiversity within a community’ and ‘populations and ecosystems’), OCR (‘Habitat Diversity’, Conservation and Diversity’ and ‘Ecosystems’), WJEC (Biodiversity) and Edexcel (‘Distribution of organisms’ and ‘ecosystems’) specifications. Fieldwork may include:

  • Management discussions

  • Quadrat Sampling

  • Identification of Species

  • Wind Measurements

  • Light Measurements

  • Soil PH Measurements

  • Temperature Measurements

  • Other Abiotic Measurements

Key mathematical skills can also be developed in a practical setting for use in examinations as well as scientific drawings throughout the study, furthermore, when back on site evaluations and presenting the data will be made easy using our top of the range ICT facilities. There is the potential to use this study to assist with practical assessments.

Freshwater ecology

Students will explore freshwater ecology to focus on aspects of changing environments and organisms and energy. Students will identify invertebrates, discuss the effects of pollution on different species and use indicator species to assess pollution. Students will collect abiotic data to discuss the differing amounts of pollution along different stretches of a river. This will link to AQA (‘Energy and Ecosystems’ and ‘Biodiversity’), WJEC (‘Biodiversity’), Edexcel (‘Productivity’, ‘Distribution of organisms’ and ‘Ethics’) and OCR (‘Habitat Biodiversity’) specifications. Fieldwork may include:

  • Kick Sampling

  • Invertebrate Identification

  • Use of Trent’s Biotic Index

  • Nitrate, Phosphate and Dissolved Oxygen Measurements

  • Temperature and PH Measurements

  • Flow Velocity Measurements

  • Width and Depth Measurements

Key mathematical skills can also be developed in a practical setting for use in examinations as well as scientific drawings throughout the study, furthermore, when back on site evaluations and presenting the data will be made easy using our top of the range ICT facilities. There is the potential to use this study to assist with practical assessments.

Heathland study

Students will explore a heathland environment comparing areas under different management schemes, the areas may include mechanical management, grazing, herbicides, burning and ‘do nothing’. They will compare biotic and abiotic factors at the different sites as well explore the reasons and effects of the different management schemes. They can use the heathland to explore succession at different stages. This will link to AQA (‘Populations and ecosystems’ and ‘Biodiversity’), WJEC (‘Biodiversity’ and ‘Succession’), Edexcel (‘Species Richness and Diversity’) and OCR (‘Ecosystems’ and ‘Diversity’) specifications. Fieldwork may include:

  • Quadrat Sampling

  • Plant Identification

  • Edaphic measurements

  • Wind Measurements

  • Light Measurements

  • Vegetation Height

  • Temperature

Key mathematical skills can also be developed in a practical setting for use in examinations as well as scientific drawings throughout the study, furthermore, when back on site evaluations and presenting the data will be made easy using our top of the range ICT facilities. There is the potential to use this study to assist with practical assessments.

Rockyshore ecology

Students will explore a Rockyshore environment and compare transects along high, middle and lower tidal zones. The study will explore the abundance and distribution of rocky shore organisms. The students will develop an understanding into sampling strategies appropriate to rocky shore ecosystems as well as exploring the classification of different species. This will link to AQA (‘Biodiversity’ and ‘Populations and Ecosystems’), WJEC (‘Biodiversity’), Edexcel (‘Species Richness and Diversity’ and ‘Ethics’) and OCR (‘Diversity’ and ‘Ecosystems’) specifications. Fieldwork may include:

  • Belt Transects

  • Species Identification

  • Abundance Scales

  • Limpet Measurements

  • Abiotic Measurements

Key mathematical skills can also be developed in a practical setting for use in examinations as well as scientific drawings throughout the study, furthermore, when back on site evaluations and presenting the data will be made easy using our top of the range ICT facilities. There is the potential to use this study to assist with practical assessments.

Sand dunes succession

Students experience a psammosere environment, conducting fieldwork from pioneer species to climax community. Students will compare biotic and abiotic differences using a logarithmic scale transect across the dune system. This will link to AQA (‘Primary succession’ and ‘Biodiversity within a community’), OCR (‘Ecosystems’ and ‘Primary succession’), Edexcel (‘Primary succession’ and ‘Species richness’) and WJEC (‘Biodiversity’) specifications. Fieldwork may include:

  • Sampling with quadrats - % cover and frequency

  • Recording abundance along a transect line 

  • Measurements of abiotic and biotic factors

  • Dune profiling 

  • Vegetation height

Key mathematical skills can also be developed in a practical setting for use in examinations as well as scientific drawings throughout the study, furthermore, when back on site evaluations and presenting the data will be made easy using our top of the range ICT facilities. There is the potential to use this study to assist with practical assessments.

Terrestrial ecology

Students will compare the abiotic and biotic factors of 2 contrasting grassland areas. Students will explore different sampling techniques and develop their understanding of species richness and diversity. This will link to AQA (‘Biodiversity within a community’ and ‘Sampling strategies’), Edexcel (‘Species richness and diversity’), OCR (‘Simpsons index of diversity’) and WJEC (‘Biodiversity’) specifications. Fieldwork may include:

  • Sampling with quadrats - % cover and frequency

  • Using different sampling techniques

  • Measurements of abiotic and biotic factors

Key mathematical skills can also be developed in a practical setting for use in examinations as well as scientific drawings throughout the study, furthermore, when back on site evaluations and presenting the data will be made easy using our top of the range ICT facilities. There is the potential to use this study to assist with practical assessments.